It was not that long ago that the issue of voluntary euthanasia polarised West Australians as bluntly as the daylight savings debate (sigh, I have given up all hope of winning on that one).

Many people worried about medically-assisted
death, even in the terminally ill, not necessarily because of religious reasons but because it was unchartered territory. 

But more candid and open discussion about death – and the harrowingly prolonged experiences of some – has made more people question long-held beliefs about what is right or wrong for the end of life. 

For doctors, the decision is even more complex, as voluntary-assisted dying might seem at odds with their oath to save lives, and they may be asked to play an active role from July 1 when VAD laws kick
in. That will be their decision alone.

There is simply another choice now, supported by the community, that will probably be taken up by few but will provide reassurance to many more. 


Many people who have had the privilege to witness a ‘good death’ in palliative care might believe that is what we should still aspire to as a community, providing the best care we can for the dying.

There is simply another choice now, supported by the community, that will probably be taken up by few but will provide reassurance to many more.

This month we also look at mental health, now considered a co-pandemic in our kids and teenagers.  The cracks were already there but COVID has added an extra layer of anxiety, and it will take more than a vaccine to fix it.