It’s always fascinating to learn the back stories of people – their background and what makes them tick. You realise what a diverse bunch of people we are.


This month, you can read Ara Jansen’s story about Perth craniofacial surgeon Linda Monshizadeh, an Iranian-born triplet whose two sisters are identical (and both pharmacists).

Her family left Iran as refugees when she was five, making their way to Pakistan with protection under the UN before coming to Australia.

Linda is a greater believer in a work-life balance and dabs in oil painting, so it is fitting she graces the cover for this month’s mental health edition.

Perhaps it is the added pressures of COVID, but it has struck me lately how much there is to be told about the mental health challenges around us. 

Many doctors are working at the health system’s frontline, which is being overwhelmed by demand from all corners, and they need to be reminded to look after their own wellbeing.

It’s like the pre-flight advice that “in the unlikely event of an emergency” people should put on their own oxygen mask before helping others. But it’s often more easily said than done.  

And while we’re talking masks, you just have to wonder how long COVID is going to overstay its welcome.

It’s like the pre-flight advice that “in the unlikely event of an emergency” people should put on their own oxygen mask before helping others. But it’s often more easily said than done.


I’m currently one of the 600,000-plus West Australians who have seen twin lines on a piece of plastic or received a text message about a positive PCR test. By the time this is being read it will probably be more like 750,000 cases – possibly a lot more.

I feel relieved I’ve had COVID and made it through unscathed.
Many others have been left feeling flat, fatigued and struggling to get through their daily workload – a bit like our public hospital system at the moment.