An edition focused on innovations seems apt at this time, as our State prepares to pivot and adapt to the first real presence of the virus that has kept the world on its toes for two years.

From this month, we will have to be as flexible as possible to stem the flow, while accepting life will be very different. What we knew about COVID yesterday could well change today.

It is risky even writing this editorial that will not be read until a few weeks’ time.

An Australian infectious disease specialist admitted late last year that it was hard to predict what COVID looks like in the future, with much of the advice based on the best guestimates at the time.

“We can’t predict what will happen in the next six months let alone next week,” he said. “I wake up in the morning to news that changes what I thought
the night before.”

And Melbourne public health professor Priscilla Robinson recently began an analysis of the current state of play with this: “I am tempted to say I just give up now.”

“We can’t predict what will happen in the next six months let alone next week… I wake up in the morning to news that changes what I thought the night before.”


Thankfully she hasn’t given up, but perhaps we shouldn’t be too judgmental of health experts – and dare I say even politicians – with “gotcha moments” accusing them of constantly changing the advice
and rules. 

Putting COVID aside for a while – yes, life goes on – this month we look at an issue that seems to confuse patients and doctors alike – is type 2 diabetes a “forever” condition or can it be stopped? 

And read the story behind our cover photo – a Perth surgeon and art collector whose first dab at novel-writing is – wait for it – a mystery involving a Perth surgeon turned art collector. Is that art imitating life?